Monday, March 6, 2017

I’m sure by now that many of you have heard of the 20,273 Project created by Jeanne Hewell-Chambers. If not, please read more about it (here).

Between January 1940 and August 1941 (before the Holocaust began), 70,273 physically and mentally disable people – men, women and children were murdered by the Nazis.

Though they never laid eyes on the disabled person they were evaluating, the Nazi doctors read the medical files and, if from the words on the page, the person was deemed “unfit” or an “economic burden on society”, the doctor placed a red X at the bottom of the form. Three doctors were to read each medical file, and when two of them made a red X on the page, the disabled person’s fate was sealed. Most were murdered within 1-2 hours.

Jeanne has undertaken the enormous task of compiling 70,272 quilt blocks. One for every victim.

If you read my blog regularly you know that I have a grandson with autism. It is beyond my comprehension how anyone could think that he would not belong in this world. He is my world!

I knew I would never be able to jam an entire quilt through my little machine so I sent the blocks pictured here. 


However, today I learned that Jeanne has established a new size. The “Skinny Quilt” is perfect for someone like me who dislikes machine quilting, but can manage something only 15” wide. You can read about it (here). Thanks Jeanne! You can be sure that more skinny quilts will be on their way to you soon.


I hope if you feel the same way I do about this horrid tragedy, that you may send a few blocks or quilts as well.

12 comments:

  1. Thanks for the reminder and the update.
    I, too, have a grandson that is under the autism spectrum disorder umbrella, and my youngest grandson has a severe seizure disorder that has left him mentally and physically handicapped. They are priceless!
    I planned to participate in this, but somehow it got away from me. I appreciate the nudge!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Very important we don't forget. A skinny quilt is a great idea.
    Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  3. i applaud you and jeanne....too horrific to even think of, let alone comprehend...preserving the sanctity of life has to be a priority...everyone has value, even the nasty smoker on floor 4 in my little village...

    ReplyDelete
  4. What a poignant way to remember such a horrific event.

    ReplyDelete
  5. As others have mentioned, this is just a horrific time in history. It is too awful to imagine this happening. Jeanne has taken on enormous task to give the recognition these victims deserve. I applaud her and all those participating.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Every life is precious, from the not-yet-born to the elders among us. This is a timely and poignant reminder.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Wendy, I hadn't heard of this project so I really do appreciate your bringing it to my attention. I definitely would love to participate! We really are lucky not to have lived at that time!

    ReplyDelete
  8. It is valuable to remember that the Nazi regime was not just bad for foreigners and religious minorities, it was bad for every day Germans as well. Germans thought Hitler would restore them to their pre-Depression prosperity, but that is not what happened. A very worthwhile project, Wendy, thanks for sharing!

    BTW, you have a typo in the first line there.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I did some blocks many months ago. Such a worthwhile project to get the word out that every person is important!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Many French quilters contribute to this project and we will have an exhibition in June ! Jeanne will be there normally... Thank you for your blocks !

    ReplyDelete
  11. Wonderful blocks, Wendy! I participated in this project last year and think skinny quilts are another great way to spread the word!

    ReplyDelete
  12. It is such an amazing project to document such a secret horror. The skinny quilts are a great idea.

    ReplyDelete